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Cream tea in Devon

Pennymoor and Exeter

Today we set off for Exeter, taking the most direct route. This turned out to be quite an experience as we negotiated miles of very narrow one lane roads lined with hedges. A bit hair-raising when we met a large truck coming the other way, but had glimpses of spectacular views as we traversed the hills! We decided to come back the long way via Tiverton which took less time and was mostly two-way roads. A very pretty drive, Devon is a beautiful area.
We loved Exeter, a very easy city to walk around and much less touristy than Bath. It was heavily bombed in WW2 and the old buildings that remain are interspersed with modern ones on wide pedestrian-only streets. The locals were out shopping up a storm on bank holiday Monday, but it felt relaxed and friendly. The cathedral is huge and surrounded by a lovey green. We went on a guided walking tour which gave us a fascinating insight into the city as it was and is now. The drizzly rain cleared in time for our cream tea beside the green in the late afternoon sun.

Cream tea in Devon

Cream tea in Devon

View of Devon from our lounge window at The Cobblers, Pennymoor

View of Devon from our lounge window at The Cobblers, Pennymoor

Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral

Saxon, Norman, Medieval buildings that survived the WW2 bombing of Exeter, including Mol's Tea House

Saxon, Norman, Medieval buildings that survived the WW2 bombing of Exeter, including Mol's Tea House

Roman city wall and remains of Rougemont Castle, built by Normans in 1068

Roman city wall and remains of Rougemont Castle, built by Normans in 1068

World's narrowest street, Parliament St in Exeter - only 25 inches wide at the far end, Doug had to walk sideways!

World's narrowest street, Parliament St in Exeter - only 25 inches wide at the far end, Doug had to walk sideways!

Posted by prosie 15:08 Archived in England

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